Do Female Law Profs Blog?

Bennett Capers (Hofsta) asked the question on PrawfsBlawg recently. For the 53 blogs published by the Law Professor Blogs Network, 30% (30/100) of the editors are female law professors. If we added female law school administrators editing blogs for the Network, the figure would increase to 34% (34/100) and this demographic does not include law professors, academic law librarians and law school administrators who blog occassionally on Network blogs. See also Capers' follow-up post: Is Blogging Just Another Boys' Club? [JH]

July 22, 2008 in Law Professor Blogging | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Steven Davidoff: From Law Professor Blogs Network to New York Times

One of the joys of creating and developing the Law Professor Blogs Network with Paul Caron (Cincinnati) is providing younger law profs with a vehicle to promote their "scholarship in action." Here's an example of what can happen.

Steven M. Davidoff (Wayne State), who launched M&A Law Prof Blog as part of our Network in April 2007, has accepted a blogging gig with the New York Times DealBook as the Deal Professor.  The New York Times offered Steven the DealBook gig after following his blogging on M&A Law Prof Blog. Read more about it: Steven's farewell post on M&A Law Prof Blog.

About this development Paul Caron writes (and I wholeheartedly agree):" [W]e feel like proud parents, sad that he is leaving the network nest but proud of the wonderful opportunity he has to attract a wider audience at the NY Times."

Congratulations and good luck, Steven. [JH]

January 14, 2008 in Law Professor Blogging | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Berkman Center's 2006 Law Blog Conference Papers (Finally) Published

The papers from the Berkman Center for Internet & Society's symposium on Bloggership:  How Blogs Are Transforming Legal Scholarship, held on April 28, 2006 at Harvard Law School, have been published. See, 84 Wash. U. L. Rev. 1025-1261 (2006). The symposium was organized by Cincinnati law prof and TaxProf Blog editor Paul Caron who observes, "it is, of course, ironic that a symposium on how blogs are transforming legal scholarship is finally published over 18 months after the event and after the papers were first posted online [on SSRN]." Details on TaxProf Blog.

The Bekman Center conference was one of the first of its kind. Paul Caron, who also co-founded the 50-plus blog Law Professor Blogs Network, reflects on the contribution of law prof blogging to legal scholarship in a recent Lexblog interview. [JH]

November 20, 2007 in Law Professor Blogging | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Roundtable Weighs In on Legal Blogs

The National Law Journal and the Association of American Law Schools co-sponsored a roundtable discussion, titled "Blogging, Scholarship and the Bench and Bar" on Sept. 17 at Santa Clara University School of Law. The co-moderators were AALS President Nancy Rogers and NLJ staff reporter Leigh Jones. Panelists were Paul Butler, Cindy Cohn, Eric Goldman, Judge Michael Daly Hawkins and Lawrence Solum. Check out the excerpts from the discussion on Law.com. [JH]

October 12, 2007 in Law Professor Blogging | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

A First? Law School Website Features Quote from Blog

The University of Chicago Law School's stunning new website front page features what I believe is a first, a quote from a law prof blog post. Here's the quote:

A firm that pays less cash, and more perks and deferred compensation, retains a mighty stick with which to hit executives who cheat. -- Todd Henderson, University of Chicago Law School Faculty Blog, October 3, 2006

Go to the website and hit the refresh button until it appears. [JH]

September 20, 2007 in Law Professor Blogging | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack

Is the Future of Legal Scholarship in the Blogosphere?

Margaret Schilt, Faculty Services Librarian, University of Chicago Law School Library, writes "if you are looking for the future of legal scholarship, chances are that you may find it not in a treatise or the traditional law review but in a different form, profoundly influenced by the blogosphere." Read the  Legal Times article for more. [JH]

September 13, 2007 in Law Professor Blogging | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Which Law Blogs Do Academic Visitors Read?

Check out Denver law prof and Race to the Bottom blogger J. Robert Brown's very interesting post! The study is based on a August 24, 2007 snapshot of law blog readership and includes a list of the most popular law professor blogs by academic visitors (those with an .edu domain) on that day. Brown provides his data at Comparison of Blog Rankings Based Upon All Visitors and Academic Visitors, August 24, 2007 (a practice I hope others would follow). The data was compiled using Justia's proprietary system for ranking blogs. See related post,  BlawgSearch Top Law Professor Blogs by edu visitors and Top Blawgs for August 2007.

See also Brown's Blogs, Law School Rankings, and TheRacetotheBottom.org article which is available on SSRN. Here's the abstract:

Blogs are changing legal scholarship. Although not a substitute for the detailed, often intricately researched analysis contained in law reviews and other scholarly publications, they fill an important gap in the scholarly continuum. Blog posts can generate ideas and discussion that can be transformed into more a systematic and thorough paper or scholarly article. At the same time, blogs provide a forum for testing ideas once they are published in more traditional venues.

While over time, a blog presence will likely become de rigueur for top scholars and law reviews, top tier schools as a group have not yet targeted blogs as a necessary component of scholarly activity. In the short term, therefore, blogs provide unique opportunities for faculty and law schools outside the top tier to enhance their reputational rankings. Blogs can enhance reputation by allowing faculty to route around some of the biases in law review placements and SSRN rankings that favor those at the top tier schools. Blogs also represent a cost effective mechanism for advertising scholarly activity.

The paper discusses the evidence that blogs enhance reputation and surveys the way that scholars at law schools outside the top tier are already harnessing blogs to enhance their reputations. The paper also discusses what it takes to create a successful blog, from the search for content to the benefits of advertising. The paper finishes with a brief history of The Race to the Bottom, a corporate governance blog.

September 10, 2007 in Blog Studies, Law Professor Blogging | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Solove's 2007 Law Professor Blogger Census

George Washington law prof Dan Solove has updated his Law Professor Blog census. According to his study there are now 265 law professor bloggers, an increase of about 17%. Read more about it. [JH]

August 6, 2007 in Blog Studies, Law Professor Blogging | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack

Law Prof Blogs Ranked by Traffic

Dave Hoffman has compiled a traffic ranking of law professor blogs using The Truth Laid Bear data which unfortunately is not comprehensive in capturing the legal blogosphere but does provide a quasi-objective standard. The Law Professor Blogs Network is well represented in this ranking thanks to the efforts of our 80 blog editors. Two of the top five blogs -- Sentencing Law & Policy and TaxProf Blog -- and 15 of the Top 50 ranked blogs are members of the Law Professor Blogs Network. [JH]

August 2, 2007 in Law Professor Blogging | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Blogs, Law School Rankings, and the Race to the Bottom

Denver law prof and The Race to the Bottom blogger Jay Brown has deposited in SSRN Blogs, Law School Rankings, and the Race to the Bottom. Here's the abstract to this very interesting paper:

Blogs are changing legal scholarship. Although not a substitute for the detailed, often intricately researched analysis contained in law reviews and other scholarly publications, they fill an important gap in the scholarly continuum. Blog posts can generate ideas and discussion that can be transformed into more a systematic and thorough paper or scholarly article. At the same time, blogs provide a forum for testing ideas once they are published in more traditional venues.

While over time, a blog presence will likely become de rigueur for top scholars and law reviews, top tier schools as a group have not yet targeted blogs as a necessary component of scholarly activity. In the short term, therefore, blogs provide unique opportunities for faculty and law schools outside the top tier to enhance their reputational rankings. Blogs can enhance reputation by allowing faculty to route around some of the biases in law review placements and SSRN rankings that favor those at the top tier schools. Blogs also represent a cost effective mechanism for advertising scholarly activity.

The paper discusses the evidence that blogs enhance reputation and surveys the way that scholars at law schools outside the top tier are already harnessing blogs to enhance their reputations. The paper also discusses what it takes to create a successful blog, from the search for content to the benefits of advertising. The paper finishes with a brief history of The Race to the Bottom, a corporate governance blog.

Editor's Note: On TaxProf Blog, Paul Caron notes that 37 of the Top 200 visited law blogs as ranked by Justia are authored by law professors. Five of the Top 10 law blogs (and ten of the Top 25 law blogs) are members of our Law Professor Blogs Network. [JH]

July 31, 2007 in Law Professor Blogging | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack